Revolutionary DSU Student Research Unveiled

Starting on Wednesday, March 27, DSU hosted several students to present and seek approval for various research projects. Both graduate and undergraduate students showcased projects of great interest to all those who attended, including The Correlations Between Mathematical Tree Graphs and an Actual Tree, The Grammatical and Structural Analysis of the Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 Voice Chat Lobby, and The Study of Usefulness of the Function Keys Shortcuts on a Standard QWERTY Keyboard with Emphasis on the Audio Interaction Keys.

The collection of research was deemed very promising to say the least. Dr. Richard Hanson, Dean of Computing, had this to say: “I think we have a lot of potential in this year’s research proposals. In particular, I would keep my eye on Matthew Mathias. His concept on the expansion of inter-dimensional fruit cups is vexing.” 

The Correlations Between Mathematical Tree Graphs and an Actual Tree by Hugo Cobblive was of a personal interest of mine, and it did not disappoint. Cobblive results on the matter were incredibly interesting. He found that in reference to a standard binary tree, a common American Elm has little to no concepts in common. He determined that standard binary trees were, in fact, not made of wood. Cobblive also noted that the accuracy of the common slang used when describing a mathematically generated tree was appalling. In normal practice, a binary tree often has its end nodes labeled as “leaves”, Cobblive found issue in this statement, mostly because for a large portion of a year a basic tree does not have any leaves on it: how fascinating.

The Grammatical and Structural Analysis of the Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 Voice Chat Lobby by Nora Jones and The Study of Usefulness of the Function Keys Shortcuts on a Standard QWERTY Keyboard with Emphasis on the Audio Interaction Keys by Edward Freice also caused much controversy.I thought it very interesting that Jones categorized her findings by age when researching a “voice chat lobby” first-hand. She found that there was much more profanity and grammatical error with participants under the age of 12. Edward Freice decided to take his research project in a different direction, “I wanted to push the boundaries of the project, to do something that had never been done and incite change in our modern world.” Freice’s research may even enlighten developers of computer keyboards to create more consumer-friendly keyboards, in removing the “useless buttons” as Freice puts it. 

In all, there were eight presentations and five more proposals at this year’s event, but none were as universally impactful as these three.

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