Second Semester, Second Chance

By / 11 months ago / Campus Life / No Comments
Second Semester, Second Chance

If, like me, the first semester of the new school year seems to sometimes be a trial run for you, then there is hope. A second semester equals a second chance. 

Retake that ‘D’ or ‘F’ class. 

     There is a relatively new concept in the field of education called the Flipped Classroom. It is where students are allowed to view content, skill or strategy before the class they are set to learn it in. The students usually view the content the night before, giving them an advantage the next day, as they are already somewhat familiar with it. This takes away quite a bit of lecture time for the teacher as well. 

    Teacher nerd aside, if you were to retake a class that you failed right away, you would essentially have the advantage the students have in a Flipped Classroom – you would have already been thoroughly exposed to the content. Being exposed to it a second time would greatly increase your chances of getting the content or skills to stick. Plus, you have now experienced what it’s like to fail a class, and that is not something most people choose to relive if given the chance to retake the class. 

    Shameless plug: If it is due to a lack of motivation or improper study skills, come to the DSU Tutoring table in the Mundt. We are more than happy to get to know you and help you out. 🙂 

 

Thank a professor. 

   In the past, I have struggled with a handful of classes. It was when I kept my anxiety about the class to myself that the grades and participation started to go down. However, when I was vulnerable and up-front and courageous enough to talk to my professors about my situation and that I would like help, that is when that anxiety was greatly eased, if not eradicated. Professors are not here to loom over you and force you to produce quality, and, if you don’t, slap you across the face with an ‘F’. They are here to expand your knowledge and exposure to this wonderful world, and to share their expertise from their field. They WANT you to succeed, but they cannot help you do that if you do not first communicate your need for help. Several professors last semester worked with me very patiently and generously, and I ended up doing far better in their classes when that one-on-one empathetic communication was established. So, thank you. If you have had a professor greatly aide you or create a significant impact on your semester, thank them. 

 

Move that car. 

   Yes, I know the freezing temps the last few months have flat out sucked. I know that when you park your car at night getting home from Wednesday Wing Night at the Stadium or working out at the CC, that you may cut corners and park as close to your dorm as possible, thinking that you will wake up early enough to move your car before the Physical Plant Police come around and slap a ticket on your windshield at 8 am. However, most of the time you will forget you parked there. Take it from a 4-time ticketer- it is not worth $60 each time to park close to the dorms in an “illegal” spot. ($60 was the ticket rate in spring of 2015, the last time I have lived in the dorms. It is likely that it has gone up, just like my student debt.) 

 

Stretch your Flex. 

    That C Store and that Einstein’s are two devils right next to each other. You grab a smoothie at Einstein’s, then feel like getting some munchies for your friend movie night, so you head right on over to the C store to grab some. As with any swiping card where you can’t see the physical money you are spending, your flex money can run out fast. Simple solution – Divide the amount of flex you have left by the number of weeks left in the semester. Your answer is what you can spend a week with your Flex. 

 

Get a house plant. 

    It will boost your mood. It will create better air in your apartment or dorm room. It will make you feel more adult-ish. I recommend starting at the Floral Shop right across from the Big White Buffalo at the edge of town. If, like me, you kill stuff easily, ask them about purchasing a low maintenance plant. 

Jenna Sorsen

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